Can Lifting Weights Cut Heart Disease Risk Better Than Bodyweight Exercises?


lifting weights vs bodyweight against heart disease

I came across an interesting article that highlighted how lifting weights weekly can cut your heart disease risk in half. Does that mean you had to pick up those iron weights again or head back up to the gym after getting along with bodyweight exercises? 

What the Scientific Finding Actually Says 

Referring to the study, writer Selene Yeager of Bicycling.com comments: 

After crunching the data, the researchers found that even a little bit of strength training went a long way for preventing heart disease. 

Now if you caught that, the real key is strength training 

And strength training is absolutely doable with calisthenics. Take note that building up strength isn’t just limited by carrying weights other than your own body’s. 

In fact, if you happen to read one of my previous posts, it highlights how you can maintain strength training using only your body weight. 

Bodyweight vs. Lifting Weights 

[The researchers] found that as little as one session a week, or less than an hour of pumping iron, cut the participants’ risks of heart disease and dying from a cardiovascular event by 40 to 70 percent, even if they didn’t get the recommended amount of aerobic exercise every week. 

To be fair, weightlifting seems to be a promising alternative for sweat-inducing aerobic exercises. 

Before you shift

But before you begin to doubt your daily calisthenics, check this out: 

Strength training was also linked to a lower body mass index (BMI), which is also associated with better heart health.

Furthermore: 

“…it’s possible that resistance training’s effects on calorie expenditure, physical function, and mood—it’s been shown to reduce anxiety and depression, both of which can take a toll on your ticker—may help explain the reduction in heart risks.” 

So, is it really about lifting weights, or is it rather a combination of known heart-healthy practices? 

View original article at bicycling.com. 

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